Wang Chung Cascade and Bride's Pool

Wang Chung Cascade

Wang Chung Cascade (Wang Chung Stream) lies in the Plover Cove Country Park at the northeast New Territories. Although it is very easy to access, hikers and visitors who are distracted by the famous Bride's Pool, the immediate neighbor of Wang Chung, often overlook it. But because of this, the cascade route remains peaceful and enjoyable.

GETTING THERE

There is a bus no.275R running between the Tai Po Market train station and Bride's Pool. This bus only operates on Sunday and public holidays. Alternatively, there is a green van running daily between Po Heung Street at Tai Po Market and Wu Kau Tang. Taking a green Taxi from Tai Po is also affordable.

For drivers, there are three public car parks right in front of Bride's Pool offering over 40 free parking spaces. After passing Tai Mei Tuk, just drive along the Bride's Pool Road. Within 10 minutes, you'll see the first car park on the right and at the entrance of the Bride's Pool BBQ Site. Opposite to this car park in front is the next car park, where there is a public toilet. Then, opposite to this second car park in further distance is the third car park with a resting pavilion.

Get off your transportation and gear yourselves up, then walk down to the Bride's Pool barbecue site. Once you have arrived at the bottom, you'll reach a little bridge, the starting point,
Taking here as the center point, the route to Wang Chung Cascade, Bride's Pool and Mirror Pool spread into three different directions. Going down stream start the route of Wang Chung. Going up stream on the let takes you to the Bride's Pool, and to the right takes you to the Mirror Pool. The routes are short, too. To complete the routes, a one-way walk takes one hour, 30 minutes, and 15 minutes respectively. Therefore, you should have sufficient time to finish the routes in a morning and then enjoy a barbecue for the rest of the day.

THE ROUTE

Wang Chung Stream leads water directly into Plover Cove Reservoir. The end of the cascade route towards downstream runs into the reservoir, and the area is called Chung Mei. Although, you may start your hike from this end, the trail could be flooded when the water level of the reservoir is high. If you are not familiar with the area, better start from the top and go back along the same way. After all, a return trip takes less than two hours. The route is spectacular during the wet seasons, but at the same time is also more dangerous for non-experienced cascade hikers. During the dry season, the route is easier, and have more resting place for observing insets, fishes and amphibians along the stream.

The route to the Bride's Pool is very short taking only 15 to 20 minutes. From the bridge go up stream along the cascade on the left hand side. The Bride's Pool is a flat pool with a two steps waterfall. The rock wall one the side of the waterfalls is vertical. There is no way to go further up to top of the stream. However, you may walk along the main road to the third car park later on, which actually seats next to the top of the waterfall. If you look from the top carefully (again, carefully) you will find that there is an eroded vertical hole in between the rocks next to the waterfall.

To go to the Mirror Pool, you have a choice of cascade route or normal walking trail. They go alongside with each other and both takes around 15 minutes' walk to the pool. The walking trail is a better choice indeed, as the cascade route is narrow and rocky. The waterfall at Mirror Pool is spectacular even during dry seasons. The pool is deeper. Swimming is definitely not recommended.

ONE LAST WORD

The Bride's Pool area is an ideal site for a family outing. There are barbecue sites, playgrounds, easy hiking trails, fabulous waterfalls, a fresh water habitat with a lot of beautiful wildlife pieces, and it is very easy to access. However, there are occasionally leftover garbage spreads around the barbecue site and on the streams. I believe it is especially important for parents to make themselves good examples for the kids, and let the kids know about the importance of protecting the environment.

AhFan
AhFan